Actual discussion with @MichaelChesnut2

This post is a largely spontaneous but very welcome follow-up to my observation notes I blogged a couple of days ago (Let’s discuss how to discuss this (c) in @MichaelChesnut’s class). As Mike and I were having our post-observation feedback session chat, more questions registered in my mind and I thought it’d be great to have the teachers whose classes I dissect actually have their say here, too. It’s only fair, and, more than that, gives another angle to look at the same experience. So here they are, a couple of questions from a curious “observer” and thoughts on that from Mike Chesnut.   

 

Q1: Do you think your students will remember you or the English/ the material they learnt with you?

I’m sure some will and some won’t. I think most students will remember some of the vocabulary I highlight and discuss in the articles we work on in class, at least for the quizzes. Whether they remember that language or actually further develop and expand the ways they speak over a longer amount of time I’m less sure about. I’m pretty sure most students will understand, after a semester in my class, the importance of using academic or business-like language in certain settings. I think they’ll be more conscious of how context can shape language use, and in some cases this might be a relatively new realization.

I’ve had some students who really improved their language skills over a year in my classes but it’s tough to say any of that had to do with my classes. Of course other students don’t seem to improve that much over the time they spend with me so there’s that.

“Remember” is a complicated word as well. I think some students may learn a lot during the semester but over the winter and summer breaks a lot can be lost, or students spend a semester or two focusing on another area of study and so when I see them again in different, more advanced class a lot of what we studied earlier needs to be reviewed.

Yea, “remember” and “learn” can be two complicated words or concepts in my opinion, even if in practice they are easily used and understood.

 

Q2: How often and actually how do you contact with other teachers in your department (especially Korean teachers)?

I have almost no contact with Korean teachers who teach English. Actually, that’s wrong. I have no contact with Korean teachers who teach English because there are none in my department and I have no contact with anyone outside of my department.

I’m in very regular contact with different Korean academics who teach interpretation and translation classes, language education classes (SLA or materials development classes for example), and applied linguistics classes, but we mostly talk about research or classroom activities that could be part of research.

I have done some work or co-teaching with Korean academics who teach interpretation and translation, coming into their classes to act as a naïve observer of their interpretation work. In some department meetings, we also talked about integrating language development classes with interpretation and translation classes so that the content would overlap, something like reading about global warming and then discussing that topic with me, and then going into an interpretation and translation class and translating documents related to global warming, but the logistics proved too complicated.

I don’t talk about my classes with the other foreign faculty in my department. It seems like every instructor just teaches their classes how they want, with the hope that by having a wide variety of approaches being used students will have many opportunities to learn in different ways. This is a pretty reasonable approach in my opinion.

 

Q3: How much of the same thing you feel you teach? How much of the same language do you feel you use when talking to students?

I think I use a lot of the same basic language during the most fundamental of my classroom routines: starting class, moving from one activity to another, ending class, and giving homework. However, I don’t recycle much content vocabulary or language more generally from class to class. This is probably something I should do but don’t right now. There are many things I should do but don’t for various reasons.

 

Q4: As the first class started and you introduced me and explained the reason I was in that class, you mentioned it was “for your professional development”. So what did it feel like and how useful (if at all) for “professional development” this experience was for you? 

It was interesting having you in my class. I initially thought I wouldn’t really care or even notice, although I also knew that in some ways I would, but several times I caught myself looking over to almost check with you to see if you were taking notes, nodding along, looking at me or the students. A few times I slowed my speech, focused more on certain students, or asked myself if I was missing anything or anyone more than I would in a regular class, and when you left early I did relax a bit!

I also thought that despite some of my academic interests, and the classes I took on how to teach, I wasn’t really using much of that “heavy teaching stuff” in this class. Instead, I was just going along with the general focus of the department which is having students read a lot outside of class and then “work on” language in class. There are various reasons for this, but again it’s not like I’ve really gone through and built these classes on solid principles, they just kind of came together over time. I also thought of this one academic I know who, while being a really interesting researcher in applied linguistics, said once he just didn’t find language teaching that interesting, so yes he teaches language classes, but generally he doesn’t think about them, talk about them, do research on them, or do much beyond just walking in and doing the class. I guess I thought about how close I was to someone like that…

I’m not sure how this experience is shaping my professional development. Perhaps I’ll just have to wait and see…

 

*****

Thanks again to Mike for taking the time and being honest about the feelings regarding the experience.

Thanks for reading, too! Stay tuned for more, I hope))

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